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Autor
Shinga Alphonsus Joseph (Federal College of Education (Technical), Gombe, Gombe State, Nigeria)
Tytuł
The Influence of Idealism on Curbing Schoolers' Defiant Behaviours
Źródło
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (ILSHS), 2014, vol. 21 (2), s. 135-144, tab., bibliogr. 33 poz.
Słowa kluczowe
Filozofia, Edukacja, Edukacja młodzieży
Philosophy, Education, Youth education
Uwagi
summ.
Abstrakt
This study intends to examine defiant behaviours among schoolers at the three levels of education in Gombe metropolis, which has reached a critical point. To guide the study, the research takes a descriptive survey design. Three research questions focusing on the defiant behaviours among schoolers were formulated. Eight institutions were randomly selected and a total number of 146 respondents were also randomly sampled for the study. A structured questionnaire with 12-items was designed. Results revealed that these defiant behaviours has caused high rate of dropouts among schoolers and so affected their contribution in the task of the nation building. It is the position of the paper that idealism, which emphasizes self-awareness and self-knowledge, can be used to tackle the problem of defiant behaviours among schoolers. (original abstract)
Pełny tekst
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Bibliografia
Pokaż
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ISSN
2300-2697
Język
eng
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